Posts Tagged ‘routing table’

VMware Cloud on AWS with NSX: Communicating with Native AWS Resources

Friday, January 5th, 2018

VMware Cloud on AWS Communicating to Native AWS Resources
I’ve also posted this blog on the VMware Network Virtualization Blog site. If you haven’t already, please read my prior two blogs on VMware Cloud on AWS: VMware SDDC with NSX Expands to AWS and VMware Cloud on AWS – SDDCs Across Different AWS Regions; I’ve also posted these on the VMware Network Virtualization Blog. The prior blogs provide a good intro and information of some of the functionality and advantages of the service. In this blog post I expand the discussion to the advantages of VMware Cloud on AWS being able to communicate with native AWS resources. This is something that would be desired if you have native AWS EC2 instances you want VMware Cloud on AWS workloads to communicate with or if you want to leverage other native AWS services like AWS S3 VPC Endpoint or RDS. (more…)

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Multitenancy on Dell Networking Switches via VRF-lite

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

Check out the Dell Networking: Multitenancy with VRF-lite white paper. I describe in detail how multitenency can be achieved on supported Dell Networking switches via Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF). VRF-lite supports multitenancy by allowing multiple different routing tables within one physical L3 switch/router. This allows for a multitenant network without having to buy additional hardware. In the diagram directly below, each color represents a different customer tenant utilizing the same IP address space (overlapping IP addresses). Such a setup can also be useful for development and testing where traffic isolation is needed; the overlapping IP addresses can be used for ensuring consistency between each development/test environment. (more…)

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EIGRP – Best Path Selection

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

By default EIGRP uses bandwidth and delay of the line to determine the best path to a remote network. However, if desired, EIGRP can use a composite of four metrics: bandwidth, delay, reliability, and load. Maximum transmission unit (MTU) is not used in EIGRP calculations but is a required parameter in some EIGRP-related commands. Also, by default, EIGRP will provide equal-cost load balancing across up to four links. You can disable load balancing by setting the ‘maximum-paths’ to ’1′. In this lab I use four Cisco 3725 routers [IOS 12.4(15)T10] to demonstrate EIGRP path selection behavior on Cisco routers. (more…)

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