Posts Tagged ‘MAC address’

Cross-VC NSX for Multi-site Solutions

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

Check-out my latest blog post, Cross-VC NSX for Multi-site Solutions, on the VMware NSX Network Virtualization blog. In the post, I discuss Cross-VC NSX functionality and step through vMotion across different vCenter domains at two different sites. (more…)

Twitt

VMware NSX Online Fundamentals – Multi-Site/Disaster Recovery

Saturday, March 19th, 2016

Check-out this overview and walk-through presentation I recently did on Cross-VC NSX functionality introduced in NSX 6.2. Deployment models, Multi-Site, and Disaster Recovery solutions are also discussed. To view the video, you must first register. You will then have access to this video and other VMware/NSX sessions that can be viewed on demand.


VMware NSX Online Fundamentals – Multi-Site/Disaster Recovery

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VMware NSX 6.2 Adds Cross-vCenter Networking and Security

Saturday, September 5th, 2015

VMware NSX
Ahead of this year’s VMworld which was just this past week (08/30 – 09/03), VMware recently released NSX 6.2 with many new and exciting features. You can see a list of new features listed in the NSX 6.2 online release notes. In this short post, I’ll briefly discuss the new Cross-vCenter Networking and Security (Cross-VC NSX) functionality. For more details and information, checkout the VMware NSX 6.2 for vSphere Documentation Center. (more…)

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Dell PowerEdge M1000e – FlexAddressing

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Dell PowerEdge M1000e as shown with detected blade servers in the Dell M1000e Chassis CMC GUI

Dell PowerEdge M1000e as shown with detected blade servers in the Dell M1000e Chassis CMC GUI

Let’s say you have a Dell PowerEdge M1000e chassis populated with Dell blade servers with CNAs. Let’s also assume you enable FCoE on the CNA and utilize it for LAN and SAN traffic.

What if you were to use the CNA port’s WWPN (World Wide Port Name) within your zoning configuration on a backend Fibre Channel switch? What would occur if the CNA adapter went bad and needed to be replaced? Well, you would have to manually change all configurations that reference the LAN MAC Address or FC WWPN. In this case, the zoning configuration would have to be updated. This is where Dell’s M1000e FlexAddressing technology can help. (more…)

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Gratuitous ARP and Basics of Connecting a Cisco IOS Switch with a Cisco CatOS Switch

Monday, October 15th, 2012

Cisco Catalyst C4003

Cisco Catalyst C4003

Some of you may have an old Cisco Catalyst switch laying around that you may want to put to use. CatOS is the old Cisco operating system for Catalyst switches that predates IOS; it can still be found on some of the old Catalyst switches which are now End of Life (EOL). In this lab I connect a Cisco Catalyst 3548-XL (Model WS-C3548-XL-EN) [IOS 12.0(5)WC13] with a Cisco Catalyst 4003 chassis (Model WS-C4003) [CatOS 5.5(20)] to demonstrate basic configuration and switching between the two. Gratuitous ARP is also discussed and demonstrated in this lab. The setup is as shown in the below lab diagram. (more…)

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Default STP Behavior on Cisco Switches

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

In a prior blog, Functionality of Layer 2 Switches/Bridges, I discussed the core functionality of layer 2 switches. In this blog, I hit upon the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) used on layer 2 switches to prevent loops. As mentioned before, loops can be created via layer 2 switches by using more than one link to connect to the same switches. This is often done for redundancy purposes but is not possible without STP. (more…)

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Cisco Port Security with Dynamic MAC Address Learning

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Port SecurityIn this lab I used a Cisco Catalyst WS-C3560G-24TS switch [IOS Version 12.2(40)SE]. Using Cisco Port Security it is possible to associate a static MAC address to a physical port on a switch. This only allows one host with that specific MAC address to connect physically to the specified port. (more…)

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Functionality of Layer 2 Switches/Bridges

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

Layer 2 Switching

Layer 2 Switching (STP Needed)

Layer 2 switches and bridges switch frames on a network while layer 3 routers route packets between networks. I once heard a network engineer being asked if a network can be made faster if the network is optimized to use more switches than routers. The network engineer answered that it shouldn’t matter. Of course, this is wrong. Think about it, if your network is just switching, the switches do not have to concern themselves with looking at the network layer; this significantly cuts down on the overhead since there is no need to decode the network header information at every stop like is done by a router. There are some concerns to keep in mind if your network starts to get too big which I discuss near the end of the blog. (more…)

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