Posts Tagged ‘linux’

Dell Open Networking and SDN – All About Disaggregation

Sunday, May 10th, 2015

Dell Open Networking
When Dell first announced its Open Networking initiative a little over a year ago, they were the first major networking vendor to do so. Very similar to what Dell did for servers, Dell is now doing for networking – allowing customers to choose their hardware and then choose what operating system they want to install. (more…)

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6WIND – From Data Plane Acceleration to Virtual Appliances

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

Data Plane Acceleration with 6WIND and Intel DPDK

Data Plane Acceleration with 6WIND and Intel DPDK


6WIND is an interesting company I’ve been following for some time now, initially out of curiosity, and then out of more curiosity :-) . They first started as a networking software company claiming to solve performance challenges for software defined networks (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). How you ask? They leverage the capabilities of multicore processors and Intel’s Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) to allow direct access to the data plane enabling a zero-copy mode from network to CPU! (more…)

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Security, Art of Hacking, & the Worst 2014 Security Breaches

Sunday, March 1st, 2015

Hacked TargetSecurity is hot; no doubt about it. Consider the fact that between 2011 and 2013, venture investors put nearly $3 billion into cyber security companies, resulting in new funding for some 300 firms (Source: Thomson Reuters). Worldwide security software revenue alone totaled $19.9 billion in 2013, a 4.9 percent increase from 2012 revenue of $19.0 billion (Source: Gartner). According to Gartner, global cybersecurity spending is to reach $76.9 billion in 2015 and $80 billion in 2016; in 2011 it stood at $55 billion. (more…)

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Cumulus Linux on Dell Switches: Spine-Leaf Architecture & OSPF on Unnumbered Interfaces

Sunday, January 18th, 2015

In a prior blog, Cumulus Linux on Dell Networking Switches, I demonstrated how to install Cumulus Linux on a Dell S6000 switch and do some basic configuration. In this blog, I’ll demonstrate how to configure routing on Dell switches running Cumulus Linux. The example covered demonstrates a Spine-Leaf architecture with OSPF on unnumbered interfaces. In this example 2 x Dell S6000-ON and 2 x Dell S4810-ON switches [Cumulus Linux 2.1.1] are utilized. The lab setup is depicted by the network diagram below. (more…)

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BASH Shell Scripting: Passing Arguments to a Python Script

Monday, September 1st, 2014

Larry Wall: “Shell programming is a 1950s juke box …”

In this short blog I write a small Python utility script to create directories and demonstrate how to utilize it and pass it arguments via BASH shell script. The functionality is similar to the ‘mkdir’ UNIX command. The name of the directory or directories to be created is the argument I pass in to the Python script. I then create a BASH shell script to call the Python script. (more…)

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openSUSE 13.1 and Useful Apps

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

OpenSUSE
openSUSE 13.1 has been released. I just installed it on an old HP 6530b laptop without issue. Screen resolution, volume, wireless internet, and USB device recognition all seem to work without any additional mucking around. Of course things may not go so smoothly with all laptops/computers depending on the hardware, however, I’ve seen hardware compatibility improve quite a bit over the last several years. Upon booting-up it seems like all works well and my wireless network is easily picked-up. The openSUSE Linux distribution sure has come a long way and is one of my favorite Linux distributions.

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IT Certifications, Innovation, and Career Growth – Making the Right Decisions

Saturday, September 7th, 2013

IT Certifications
I often get asked, “What certification should I get next?” There is no right way to answer this question without a deeper analysis of why a certification is being sought in the first place. I’ll focus specifically on IT certifications and direct this article more towards technologists/engineers/tech entrepreneurs. In my opinion, there are too many IT certification hoarders jumping from one certification to the next; I have some friends who definitely fall in this category. I also have my share of certifications as well (Cisco, VMware, etc.), although by no means is IT certifications my first priority or even my second priority. These days it seems like just about every vendor and third party is coming out with some sort of certification and cashing-in on this ‘IT certification’ phenomena. So, do IT certifications really help and should you invest the time and money to get one? (more…)

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Configuring a Syslog Server on CentOS 6.3 for Dell Force10 Switches

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

In this lab I’m going to demonstrate how to configure a syslog server to use with Dell Force10 switches. A syslog server can be used to store log files remotely on an external server. Syslog servers can be invaluable when troubleshooting. If a switch ever fails or reboots, no worries your logs are still available via the syslog server, and you can now analyse them to troubleshoot. An engineer can have multiple network devices write to one syslog file, or, if desired, a seperate syslog file can be created and stored remotely for each network device. (more…)

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Linux – tar command

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

The linux ‘tar’ program (name derived from tape archive) is a useful utility for archiving/transmitting files. A ‘.tar’ file does not represent compressed files; it is a collection of files within a single uncompressed file. If the file is a ‘.tar.gz’ (also called ‘tarball’) or ‘.tgz’ file, it is a collection of files that are compressed. In the below examples, I always compress/decompress with the ‘z’ flag. (more…)

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