Posts Tagged ‘Intel’

Advanced VMware NSX Security Services with Check Point vSEC

Saturday, March 19th, 2016


If you haven’t already, checkout my post on the VMware Network Virtualization blog where I describe and show a demo on Advanced VMware NSX Security Services with Check Point vSEC. Most of the information is from prior posts I had written on my personal blog here, but I do aggregate some information and add some additional details: Advanced VMware NSX Security Services with Check Point vSEC.

Twitt

VMware NSX and Comprehensive Security for the SDDC

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015

I’ve written several prior articles on the VMware NSX network virtualization platform as it relates to security. NSX offers such a robust platform for security, I sometimes come across folks interested in NSX yet not aware of the full potential of NSX in terms of security. I hope to provide some additional insight in this short blog. (more…)

Twitt

Advanced Security with VMware NSX and Check Point vSEC [Video]

Monday, September 28th, 2015

In a prior blog, I wrote about VMware NSX and Check Point vSEC integration for advanced security. Check out the VMware NSX Check Point vSEC demo on the VMware NSX YouTube channel or embedded directly below. In this demo, I step through a quick overview of Check Point vSEC, step through deployment, and show an example of URL Filtering and Application Identification. (more…)

Twitt

VMware NSX: Advanced Security Services with Check Point vSEC

Wednesday, August 12th, 2015

Check Point vSEC

Check Point vSEC

In early 2014, the well known security company, Check Point, announced it was collaborating with VMware to integrate its security software with NSX to help automate and simplify the provisioning of advanced security services. Just last month, Check Point announced its Check Point vSEC solution for NSX. (more…)

Twitt

6WIND – From Data Plane Acceleration to Virtual Appliances

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

Data Plane Acceleration with 6WIND and Intel DPDK

Data Plane Acceleration with 6WIND and Intel DPDK


6WIND is an interesting company I’ve been following for some time now, initially out of curiosity, and then out of more curiosity :-) . They first started as a networking software company claiming to solve performance challenges for software defined networks (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). How you ask? They leverage the capabilities of multicore processors and Intel’s Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) to allow direct access to the data plane enabling a zero-copy mode from network to CPU! (more…)

Twitt

Intel VT FlexMigration and AMD-V Extended Migration – Enabling Dynamic, Agile Data Centers

Saturday, December 3rd, 2011

VMware VMotionServer virtualization/consolidation is becoming a norm and data centers and enterprises are now looking towards the horizon at how to bring dynamic, agile, and flexible capabilities to their IT infrastructure.

What I will focus on here is one specific technology that helps meet this goal called Live Migration, the capability to move active Virtual Machines (VMs) across a pool of physical servers with no downtime. If a VM is running on a server that is reaching high utilization or where resources are becoming constrained, Live Migration can migrate the active VM to a different physical server with absolutely no downtime. Now this is what I call truly dynamic and agile! (more…)

Twitt

Intel Hyper-Threading Technology

Saturday, December 3rd, 2011

Intel Core i7Intel Hyper-Threading Technology (HT Technology) enables each processing core to run multiple tasks or “threads” at the same time. Intel HT Technology also improves overall performance on threaded software by increasing processor throughput. For each physical processor core, the operating system addresses two virtual processors. For example, a processor with two cores with HT Technology will be capable of 4-way multitasking. (more…)

Twitt

Symmetrical Multiprocessing in the Physical and Virtual World

Saturday, April 23rd, 2011

Quad Core Intel Xeon E7500

Quad Core Intel Xeon E7500

The continuous shrinking of transistor size has pushed the limits of how many transistors can be placed on a single die (currently in the millions). In consequence, to utilize the increased amount of transistors, the CPU or “the core” has been replicated multiple times on the same die. Todays CPUs contain multiple cores with each core having fast L1 caches and sharing either a larger L2 or L3 cache, the bus interface, and the external die connections. For example, an Intel Xeon 7500 can support 8 sockets each with 8 cores for a total of 64 cores. Physical machines now commonly use multiple processors, but even in a multi-core processor, each core is treated as a seperate CPU. What this means is that even a multi-core CPU is taking advantage of symmetrical multiprocessing (SMP). (more…)

Twitt