Posts Tagged ‘Dell Force10 S50N’

Automating VLAN Configuration on Dell FTOS Switches via GVRP

Saturday, February 22nd, 2014

GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) is a standards-based protocol defined in the IEEE 802.1Q specification that provides for automatic VLAN configuration on switches. The Generic Attribute Registration Protocol (GARP) is used by switches supporting GVRP to register/de-register attribute values such as VLAN IDs between switches within the network. GVRP is the standards-based equivalent to Cisco’s Virtual Trunk Protocol (VTP). To read more about Cisco VTP, read my prior blog at networkpros.org. For this blog, I utilize 2 x Dell S60s [FTOS 8.3.3.8 ]and 1x Dell S50N [FTOS 8.4.2.7]. Below is the network diagram for this lab. (more…)

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Redistribution of EIGRP and OSPF in a Hybrid Cisco/Dell Network

Sunday, February 16th, 2014


Check out my latest blog on networkpros.org where I demonstrate redistributing EIGRP routes into OSPF and redistributing OSPF routes into EIGRP in a mixed Cisco IOS and Dell FTOS environment. Of course only the Cisco switches are running EIGRP and all Dell switches are running OSPF. A Cisco Catalyst 6509 switch chassis is running both EIGRP and OSPF, and this is where the redistribution occurs. For this lab I use 1 x Cisco Catalyst 6509 [IOS 12.2(18)SXD7b], 1 x Cisco 7204VXR router [IOS 12.2(11)T9], 2 X Dell S60s [FTOS 8.3.3.8], and 2 x Dell S50Ns [FTOS 8.4.2.7].

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Understanding and Implementing Flow Control on Dell Force10 Switches

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Ethernet flow control allows for a receiving node to temporarily stop the transmission of data from the sending node. As defined by IEEE 802.3x this is accomplished via the PAUSE frame. (more…)

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Dell Force10 – Layer 2 Multipathing via Virtual Link Trunking (VLT)

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

In this blog I use one Dell Force10 S50N [FTOS 8.4.2.7] and three Dell Force10 S4810 switches [FTOS 8.3.12.1] to demonstrate Dell Force10′s layer 2 mulipathing technology called Virtual Link Trunking (VLT). With VLT, you can create a LAG for a server, switch, or any device that supports LACP to two different upstream switches.

Traditionally, a LAG from an access switch or server could only connect to a single upstream switch. For redundanacy purposes, many users would implement stacking on the upstream switches and then use a port-channel/LAG up to the stacked switch now seen as one logical entity. However, stacking is not the preferred solution here. Two main reasons for this is that stacking provides a single control plane mechanism that is managed by the master switch; there is no hitless failover. Compare this to VLT which provides a dual control plane mechanism and is hitless in nature. Additionally, when upgrading the switch firmware, the entire stack would need to be brought down. With VLT, one switch can be upgraded at a time without bringing down the other switch.

Stacking is more seen at the ToR or access layer. The ToR switches are usually stacked and VLT is then used upstream to the aggregate and core switches. However, if the ToR switch supports VLT such as the S4810 does, VLT can also be used from the switch down to the server. 1 GbE switches like the Dell S50N and Dell S60 do not support VLT, so, in these cases, stacking can still be employed.

In the least recommended approach, if no VLT or stacking is used at the aggregate layer connecting to the ToR on a layer 2 network, spanning tree protocol (STP) would need to be employed to block redundant links. This would create link and switch level redundancy. The issue with this is that you lose half the ports/bandwidth on the switch. By leveraging VLT, you can have an active-active multi-path connection from an access server/switch to two upstream switches seen as one logical entity employing a dual control plane mechanism. No putting-up with STP or blocked ports! (more…)

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Multi-Area OSPF in a Mixed Cisco and Dell Force10 Environment

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

In this lab I use one Cisco 2621XM [IOS 12.4(2)T], one Cisco 2621 [IOS 12.3(18)], one Cisco 3660 [IOS 12.1(1)T], one Cisco 3640 [IOS 12.1(2)T], one Cisco 3550-24PWR-SMI [IOS 12.2(44)SE6], one Dell Force10 S60 [FTOS 8.3.3.7], and one Dell Force10 S50N [FTOS 8.4.2.6] to demonstrate multi-area OSPF in a mixed environment of Cisco and Dell Force10 switches. Below is a diagram of my lab setup. (more…)

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Trunking and DHCP Across Dell Force10 Switches

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

I did this lab some time back and thought it would be useful to post. In this lab I use a Dell Force10 S25P (FTOS 8.4.2.6) switch and Dell Force10 S50N (FTOS 8.4.2.6) switch to demonstrate trunking and Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) for multiple subnets. Both of these switches are layer 2/3 switches, however, I use the S25P to do all the routing and use the S50N strictly as a layer 2 switch. (more…)

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