Archive for the ‘Linux’ Category

6WIND – From Data Plane Acceleration to Virtual Appliances

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

Data Plane Acceleration with 6WIND and Intel DPDK

Data Plane Acceleration with 6WIND and Intel DPDK


6WIND is an interesting company I’ve been following for some time now, initially out of curiosity, and then out of more curiosity :-) . They first started as a networking software company claiming to solve performance challenges for software defined networks (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). How you ask? They leverage the capabilities of multicore processors and Intel’s Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) to allow direct access to the data plane enabling a zero-copy mode from network to CPU! (more…)

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Security, Art of Hacking, & the Worst 2014 Security Breaches

Sunday, March 1st, 2015

Hacked TargetSecurity is hot; no doubt about it. Consider the fact that between 2011 and 2013, venture investors put nearly $3 billion into cyber security companies, resulting in new funding for some 300 firms (Source: Thomson Reuters). Worldwide security software revenue alone totaled $19.9 billion in 2013, a 4.9 percent increase from 2012 revenue of $19.0 billion (Source: Gartner). According to Gartner, global cybersecurity spending is to reach $76.9 billion in 2015 and $80 billion in 2016; in 2011 it stood at $55 billion. (more…)

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MariaDB and the Future of MySQL

Sunday, June 1st, 2014


As you may know by now, since the acquisition of Sun Microsystems by Oracle in 2009 for $7.4 billion, there has been some uncertainty in the industry on the future of MySQL which Sun Microsystems itself acquired for $1 billion in 2008. Even as Oracle professed to provide the same level of support and development effort for the future of MySQL, many within the open source community remained pessimistic. One such pessimist was the father of MySQL, Michael “Monty” Widenius, who forked the MySQL code the day the Sun Microsystems acquisition was announced. (more…)

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openSUSE 13.1 and Useful Apps

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

OpenSUSE
openSUSE 13.1 has been released. I just installed it on an old HP 6530b laptop without issue. Screen resolution, volume, wireless internet, and USB device recognition all seem to work without any additional mucking around. Of course things may not go so smoothly with all laptops/computers depending on the hardware, however, I’ve seen hardware compatibility improve quite a bit over the last several years. Upon booting-up it seems like all works well and my wireless network is easily picked-up. The openSUSE Linux distribution sure has come a long way and is one of my favorite Linux distributions.

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Configuring a Syslog Server on CentOS 6.3 for Dell Force10 Switches

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

In this lab I’m going to demonstrate how to configure a syslog server to use with Dell Force10 switches. A syslog server can be used to store log files remotely on an external server. Syslog servers can be invaluable when troubleshooting. If a switch ever fails or reboots, no worries your logs are still available via the syslog server, and you can now analyse them to troubleshoot. An engineer can have multiple network devices write to one syslog file, or, if desired, a seperate syslog file can be created and stored remotely for each network device. (more…)

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Linux – tar command

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

The linux ‘tar’ program (name derived from tape archive) is a useful utility for archiving/transmitting files. A ‘.tar’ file does not represent compressed files; it is a collection of files within a single uncompressed file. If the file is a ‘.tar.gz’ (also called ‘tarball’) or ‘.tgz’ file, it is a collection of files that are compressed. In the below examples, I always compress/decompress with the ‘z’ flag. (more…)

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Unix shell script – convert Mac ASCII file to Unix ASCII file

Sunday, July 10th, 2011

With some applications like Microsoft Word you can save a file in ASCII format. However, for new lines Macs use a carriage return (ASCII character 015) while Unix uses a linefeed (ASCII character 012). If you save the file as ASCII on a Mac and open the file up in Unix it will look like one very long paragraph. Just to be complete, I will mention that Microsoft Windows uses a carriage return + linefeed combination between lines of text. Below is a shell script that will take a number of file inputs in Unix and convert the Mac files to the correct Unix format. The original file will be overwritten. At the command prompt you would enter the command as “mactounix [macfile 1] [macfile 2] [macfile 3]” etc… The is assuming you save the code to a file called mactounix and made it executable (chmod +x mactounix). (more…)

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How to install Tomcat 6 on Ubuntu Server

Sunday, April 24th, 2011

Before installing Tomcat, make sure you have the Java Runtime Environment installed. You can check this with the following command:

dpkg –get-selections | grep sun-java

(more…)

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Installing Chrome Browser on Ubuntu 10.10

Sunday, December 26th, 2010

Below is a walk-through of how to install Google Chrome on Ubuntu 10.10. I’ve listed two methods of installation – one using ‘apt-get’ and the other using ‘dpkg’. The main difference is that ‘apt-get’ will resolve dependencies for you and ‘dpkg’ will not. Remember to if you are not logged in as root or another superuser, use ‘sudo’ in front of every command. (more…)

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How to install Flash, Python, and Java on Ubuntu 10.10

Saturday, December 25th, 2010

Just some quick tips on how to install Flash, Python, and Java on Ubuntu 10.10. Flash and Python are pretty straight-forward. However, installing Java is slightly more complicated since Sun’s (now Oracle) Java 6 has been removed from the Ubuntu Multiverse. The Ubuntu gatekeepers are now more heavily asserting that people follow their recommendation for using “OpenJDK.” (more…)

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